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Mark Twain once said, “There are two seasons in New England: Winter and the Fourth of July”. But Mark Twain never drove a car. If he had, we suspect he might have added, “Pothole Season”.

Here in New England, the snow and ice of winter combined with torrential rains have left roads in bad shape. The repeated freezing and thawing of moisture seeps through road surfaces and causes potholes.

Keep these driving tips in mind this Spring as you travel:

Hitting potholes can throw your car’s front end out of alignment. If you feel your car “pulling” during driving, that’s a clue that you could have a problem. Check the tread on your tires: uneven tread wear can be a sign of misalignment. If you hit a severe pothole, have Nissan of Keene check your vehicle’s alignment and tire balance.

When you hit a pothole you can damage your tire and/or your vehicle’s wheel. Keeping your tires properly inflated will help reduce damage from potholes and other road hazards.

The impact of potholes on tires increases dramatically with speed and can cause hidden, internal damage that could lead to tire failure weeks, or even months, later. It’s best to avoid potholes entirely, but if that’s not possible, don’t brake during the pothole impact. Instead, apply brakes before hitting a pothole and release them just prior to impact. Braking during the impact sets up the tire and wheel assembly for a “solid hit” against the edge of the hole. Less severe damage occurs when a tire is rolling than when it is skidding over a hole during braking.

But there is a little bit of good news in all this: Right now Nissan of Keene has what we call “The Nissan of Keene Mud Season/ Pothole Special”. It’s a great deal and will put your mind at ease. (Heck, we’ll even clean the mud off your car and wash the windows as part of the deal.) Click here for details.

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2 Comments

  1. I reverently believe that the Maker who made us all makes everything in New England but the weather. I don’t know who makes that, but I think it must be raw apprentices in the weather-clerk’s factory who experiment and learn how, in New England, for board and clothes, and then are promoted to make weather for countries that require a good article, and will take their custom elsewhere if they don’t get it.

    -Clemens

    Like

  2. I reverently believe that the Maker who made us all makes everything in New England but the weather. I don’t know who makes that, but I think it must be raw apprentices in the weather-clerk’s factory who experiment and learn how, in New England, for board and clothes, and then are promoted to make weather for countries that require a good article, and will take their custom elsewhere if they don’t get it.

    Like


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